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Friday, 7 September 2007

Sacred Visions Ed: Andrew M. Greeley & Michael Cassutt

Sacred Visions
Edited by Andrew M. Greeley and Michael Cassutt

TOR

ISBN 0312851731


I have found that it is hard to review a collection of writings from different authors. In part, because it can be trite to state which is your favorite story and which is your least. It is also unfair to compare the writing styles of the different authors. Collections serve a variety of purposes; the first is to give you samples of a number of authors' writings, and the second is often that those writings are grouped by type or style or purpose. This collection fits both categories. It is a collection from 12 authors writing about the universal questions of faith and ethics, within a Catholic context and of a science fiction of fantasy theme. Four of the pieces were specifically commissioned for this volume and the other eight are classics of Science Fiction, including the short story form of two award winning novels.

The works included are:

  • Gus - Jack McDevitt
  • The Pope of the Chimps - Robert Silverberg
  • Curious Elation - Michael Cassutt
  • Trinity - Nancy Kress
  • Saint Theresa of the Aliens - James Patrick Kelly
  • Our Lady of the Endless Sky - Jeff Duntemann
  • The Seraph from Its Sepulcher - Gene Wolfe
  • A Case of Conscience - James Blish
  • Xorinda the Witch - Andrew M. Greeley
  • A Canticle for Leibowitz - Walter M. Miller Jr.
  • The Quest for Saint Aquin - Anthony Boucher
  • And Walk Now Gently Through the Fire - R.A. Lafferty

I first read this book years ago. Now I pick it up from time to time and randomly read stories. The stories are varied and powerful; they will evoke emotions, faith, doubt and awe.

This collection is some of the best religious science fiction I have ever read. It will be a good read for any Catholic, or a Christian who would like a different look into the Catholic faith. It will also be a good read for fans of science fiction, for some of the works included are considered masterpieces in the genre.

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