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Sunday, 23 April 2017

Second Sunday Of Easter Reflection - Amy Welborn from Daybreaks: Daily Reflections for Lent and Easter

Daybreaks: Daily Reflections for Lent and Easter 
ISBN 9780764826870
ASIN B01N4QF53K



Note: I posted the first devotion from this book with permisssion, on Ash Wednesday. And this is the last devotion in the book. I plan on writing a full review but loved this reflection and wanted to share it. I highly recommend this book pick it up and read it next year through lent.

Second Sunday Of Easter 

Today has five names. It is the Octave of Easter, the Second Sunday of Easter, and Divine Mercy Sunday. Before the reforms of the Second Vatican Council, it was known as Low Sunday to indicate that it was the end of the eight days and that Easter had been duly celebrated and now it was time to bring the celebrating down a few degrees. Before Vatican II, it was also known as Sunday in White to indicate that this was the last day those who had been baptized during the Easter Vigil wore their white baptismal garment. 

So no matter what title you prefer to give this day, it might be good to blow a trumpet or to think about a trumpet on this eighth day of the Easter season. In the world of the Bible, a trumpet sounded the religious assembly, particularly that one at the end of time. It is designed to call the faithful to the final gathering and to awaken the dead to the resurrection promised by the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

A trumpet can be found in the Book of Revelation "on the Lord's day" (1: 10). John of Patmos hears "a voice as loud as a trumpet" (1: 10) telling him to write a message to seven churches; the letters inform the members of the church about their faithfulness to the message of Jesus. In most of biblical literature, a trumpet is a sign that God is speaking; however, in this case, it is the risen Son of Man who is telling John what to write. John, of course, hearing the trumpetlike voice, is scared. "Do not be afraid," Jesus tells him. "I am the first and the last, the one who lives. Once I was dead, but now I am alive forever and ever" (1: 17- 18). Then the Son of Man begins to dictate his letters to his secretary, John.

The trumpet summons us on this Lord's day to join others around the world in continuing to celebrate the Easter season, which lasts for six more weeks and ends with Pentecost Sunday. Unlike Thomas, who needs to see the risen Christ in order to believe that God has, indeed, raised him from the dead, we hear the trumpet summoning us to receive the Holy Spirit, who sends us on our mission with this good news. Hopefully, we are counted among those whom Jesus declared to be blessed, "those who have not seen and have believed" (John 20: 29). Thus, every day we profess our faith in the resurrection is a little Easter. Listen for the sound of the trumpet!

"I was caught up in spirit on the Lord's day and heard behind me a voice as loud as a trumpet." Revelation 1:10

Books by Amy Welborn:
Reconciled to God Daily Lenten Devotions
Wish You Were Here: Travels Through Loss and Hope
A Catholic Woman's Book of Days
de-Coding Da Vinci: The Facts Behind the Fiction of the Da Vinci Code
Loyola Kids Book of Saints
Loyola Kids Book of Heroes: Stories of Catholic Heroes and Saints throughout History
Prove It! God
Prove It! Church
Prove It! Jesus
Prove It! The Catholic Teen Bible
Here. Now. a Catholic Guide to the Good Life
The Words We Pray
Praying the Rosary: With the Joyful, Luminous, Sorrowful, and Glorious Mysteries
Decoding Mary Magdalene: Truth, Legend, and Lies
Come Meet Jesus: An Invitation from Pope Benedict XVI
Be Saints! An Invitation from Pope Benedict XVI
Mary and the Christian Life: Scriptural Reflections on the First Disciple
Adventures in Assisi: On the Path with St. Francis: On the Path with St. Francis
Prepare Him Room: Advent Family Devotions
Daybreaks: Daily Reflections for Lent and Easter 
Parables: Stories of the Kingdom

Prove It Series:
Prove It! God
Prove It! Church
Prove It! Jesus
Prove It! Prayer
Prove It! You
Prove It! The Catholic Teen Bible


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